January- April 2019 Content

4/8/2019

NO ONE VISITED PREMATURE BABY FOR 5 MONTHS BEFORE A NURSE ADOPTED HER

A premature baby spent months in a Massachusetts hospital with no visitors before nurse Liz Smith met the child and eventually adopted her. Liz Smith and her daughter, Gisele, joined CNN's New Day to tell their story. and Giselle stole the show. Take a look, it will make your day.


ENJOY

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3/18/2019

8-YEAR-OLD HOMELESS REFUGEE CROWNED CHESS CHAMPION IN NEW YORK

In a homeless shelter in Manhattan, an 8-year-old boy is walking to his room, carrying an awkward load in his arms, unfazed by screams from a troubled resident. The boy is a Nigerian refugee with an uncertain future, but he is beaming.


He can’t stop grinning because the awkward load is a huge trophy, almost as big as he is. This homeless third grader has just won his category at the New York State chess championship.


Much of the news of the last week has focused on wealthy families buying access to great universities, either illegally through bribes or legally through donations. There is no question that America is a tilted playing field that gives wealthy children huge advantages.


So we should all grin along with Tanitoluwa Adewumi, went undefeated at the state tournament last weekend, outwitting children from elite private schools with private chess tutors. He won the kindergartener through third-grade category in New York’s chess championship last weekend with an undefeated performance, according to New York Times columnist Nicholas Kristof.


WATCH THIS

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3/8/2019

YOUNG GIRL WROTE LETTER TO STEPH CURRY HELPS DESIGN CURRY 6'S FOR INTERNATIONAL WOMEN'S DAY

Nine-year-old Riley Morrison wrote a letter to Warriors guard Steph Curry last fall asking why his Under Armour signature shoes were only sold in boys' sizes. Not only did Curry address the inequality and have the shoes listed under the site's girls' section right away. He also surprised Riley with two pairs of his new Curry 6s on Christmas Day.


While Riley was excited by both of the gestures, nothing beat the three-time NBA champs' latest: Curry had Riley help design a pair of his shoes in honor of International Women's Day. 


"I was immediately impressed when I saw Riley's letter; that a nine-year-old girl had the courage to use her voice to call attention to an issue and keep us accountable," Curry said. "She was focused on the opportunity for ALL girls, not just herself. She's been an amazing catalyst for change–not only with my product but also with the entire Under Armour brand. She is inspiring, and wise beyond her years."

  

Riley helped Curry create the UA ICON Curry 6 United We Win colorway, which the company says are a blend of purple and deep orchid with white. The shoes will release on International Women’s Day on March 8. #GrlPwr #InternationalWomensDay #FindYourVoice #FromTheMouthOfBabes

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2/14/2019

COLLEGE ATHLETE WITH DOWN SYNDROME WOWS PRO GOLFERS

It was supposed to be a simple gesture: PGA stars Gary Woodland and Matt Kuchar providing a special day for a Special Olympics athlete. But then, Amy Bockerstette, a golfer with Down syndrome, hit her tee shot in the practice round for this month's Waste Management Phoenix Open. The shot plopped in the sand.


"There was a moment when Gary Woodland offered to take the ball out of the sand trap. She would have nothing of it," said her father, Joe Bockerstette. Amy had an eight-foot putt for par and made it. The shot was met with applause — a moment Amy dreamed of. Video of the moment has now been viewed over 18 million times. Golf is Amy's passion, and she's the first athlete with Down syndrome to earn a full athletic scholarship. She now plays on the Paradise Valley Community College golf team.   


"People with Down syndrome have value and they bring joy," said Jenny Bockerstette, Amy's mother. "The response that we've gotten from parents of people with disabilities has been very touching because I feel like we're doing this for them, too." 


CHECK IT OUT

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2/7/2019

10 YEAR OLD CANCER SURVIVOR AT STATE OF THE UNION

A 10-year old girl from New Jersey who was honored during the President's State of the Union address for being a cancer survivor and fundraiser returned home after her whirlwind tour to the nation's capital. Tuesday night she was in the House of Representatives for the President's address.  There she was sitting next to First Lady Melania Trump and being recognized for being a cancer survivor and her extraordinary cancer fundraising efforts.  


"She rallied her community and raised more than $40,000 for the fight against cancer," President Trump said. Grace stood to a thunderous standing ovation. "I felt very special and honored that people were just cheering for me, so that was pretty special for me," Grace said. "It was really celebrating her accomplishments because it was not easy what she did. And the second part was a way to bring awareness," her mother Aubrey said.  


After Grace's diagnosis with a brain tumor last year, she and her family began working with The Valerie Fund which supports children with cancer and their families. "She's ten-year-old raising tens or hundreds of thousands of dollars to help other kids fighting the same battle she is," Executive Director of the Valerie Fund Barry Kirschner said. Grace has big plans to continue her fundraising and staying positive as a cancer survivor. "I think the lesson is to always keep a smile and find the positive," Grace said. "You should only find the light in the darkness, that's what I like to say."  "One thing this journey has taught us is to celebrate the small wins and don't take anything for granted," Aubrey said.   


During her trip, she and her mother personally met the President. "When you see him up close he is very nice," she said. "She was very polite and she was checking on me to make sure that I was okay," Grace said about being with the First Lady. She did mention the trip was an "ultimate 10".  


For more information on The Valerie Fund, click here.

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1/31/2019

Boston Fashion Show Takes On Gun Violence

Dozens of models took to the runway in Boston over the weekend, and all of them shared a common thread: all had lost relatives to gun violence. Several local designers showed their work at the Sunday event aimed at maintaining awareness of rampant mass shootings in the United States. 


Some 48 people were shot dead in Boston in 2018, according to city police figures, slightly more than the previous year's 45 and significantly more than the past five year's average, 37. The bulk of these homicides occurred in neighborhoods with heavy black populations.


Activist Asia Jackson spearheaded the event with the organization "We are Better 2gether," with the proceeds going to groups supporting relatives of the victims. "They loved the idea," Jackson said of these relatives. "Nobody has done it." 


"We wanted them to represent their lost loved ones, come to the fashion show, be in the fashion show."The festive event saw the models-for-a-day of all ages and sizes parade down the catwalk before a packed room in downtown Boston. "I think it raised some awareness about finding another way to battle instead of with violence," said Ebony LePenn, whose husband Anthony Clay was shot dead in 2016. The event offered another outlet to "express your emotions," she said, adding that it shows "we're not forgotten."


"We can turn the pain into purpose."


See More of the Show

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